1. How to keep water fresh like dew
My grandparents live in a traditional way, they use petromax lamp, well, fireplace to cook,  and of course they don’t have fridge. 
Every time I visit them, they always serve fresh foods and waters.
They use clay tea pots and clay jars.
The clay jars used to store bathing water and the tea pot  for drinking water. Well, the cold level is not as cold as fridge water but it’s fresh like dew and fresh enough for your throat and of course healthy.
You could find clay tea pots and jars in every clay utilities stores.
The tips to make your water fresh like dew is store the water for about one night long before used, and close tightly withe the tea pot cap. The longer you store it the fresher it become.
And if you have a better way, tell me :) 
Esti Nurnani,  Jakarta,  Indonesia

    How to keep water fresh like dew

    My grandparents live in a traditional way, they use petromax lamp, well, fireplace to cook,  and of course they don’t have fridge. 

    Every time I visit them, they always serve fresh foods and waters.

    They use clay tea pots and clay jars.

    The clay jars used to store bathing water and the tea pot  for drinking water. Well, the cold level is not as cold as fridge water but it’s fresh like dew and fresh enough for your throat and of course healthy.

    You could find clay tea pots and jars in every clay utilities stores.

    The tips to make your water fresh like dew is store the water for about one night long before used, and close tightly withe the tea pot cap. The longer you store it the fresher it become.

    And if you have a better way, tell me :) 

    Esti Nurnani,  Jakarta,  Indonesia

     
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  3. Room Temperature Egg Storage
It’s really not difficult to store eggs at room temperature for months. An egg shell is slightly porous, Microscopic holes are how airborne contaminants can penetrate to the interior and spoil the egg.
solution: Coat the eggs with mineral oil, available at any pharmacy (sometimes found in the laxative section). Wear food handling gloves or any surgical glove and coat each egg by hand and replace in the container they came in. I’ve taken this out to six months at about 68-70 F with no problem. Some properties are lost, like the ability of the egg white to be beaten to a meringue. The oxygen and airborne pathogens that can ruin eggs are occluded from the interior. Flip the egg containers monthly. I have eaten eggs stored outside the refrigerator at 9 months and I couldn’t tell the difference between them and fresh eggs. 
- James Holmes

    Room Temperature Egg Storage

    It’s really not difficult to store eggs at room temperature for months. An egg shell is slightly porous, Microscopic holes are how airborne contaminants can penetrate to the interior and spoil the egg.

    solution: Coat the eggs with mineral oil, available at any pharmacy (sometimes found in the laxative section). Wear food handling gloves or any surgical glove and coat each egg by hand and replace in the container they came in. I’ve taken this out to six months at about 68-70 F with no problem. Some properties are lost, like the ability of the egg white to be beaten to a meringue. The oxygen and airborne pathogens that can ruin eggs are occluded from the interior. Flip the egg containers monthly. I have eaten eggs stored outside the refrigerator at 9 months and I couldn’t tell the difference between them and fresh eggs. 

    - James Holmes

     
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  5. Meat Packages
I learned in history class that in medieval Europe people would keep their meat fresh by covering it with salt &/or dried herbs such as basil or parsley before wrapping it in the butcher paper for storage. It became so customary there that eventually the practice found it’s way in to modern culinary practices to season the beef before cooking. :D
The same practice was used for storing milk, I think the herb was lavender but I’m not 100% sure on that.

Tina Q. Boulder, CO. USA

    Meat Packages

    I learned in history class that in medieval Europe people would keep their meat fresh by covering it with salt &/or dried herbs such as basil or parsley before wrapping it in the butcher paper for storage. It became so customary there that eventually the practice found it’s way in to modern culinary practices to season the beef before cooking. :D

    The same practice was used for storing milk, I think the herb was lavender but I’m not 100% sure on that.

    Tina Q. Boulder, CO. USA

     
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  7. heytoyourmamanem:

Dolores Harris, daughter of FSA (Farm Security Administration) client George Harris, with canned food prepared by her mother. Dameron, Maryland.
August 1940
Jack Delano, photographer
Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

    heytoyourmamanem:

    Dolores Harris, daughter of FSA (Farm Security Administration) client George Harris, with canned food prepared by her mother. Dameron, Maryland.

    August 1940

    Jack Delano, photographer

    Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

     
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  9. Bottling plums in water
I have opened a bottle of plums which I bottled in water by packing a Kilner Jar with plums then pouring boiling water over before bringing the bottle back to the boil, keeping it at boiling point for 3 mins then screwing the top on.  I kept tightening the top until the jar was cold and then put it in a cool dark place.  This was 2 years ago and when I opened it yesterday and cooked the plums in a pie they tasted lovely. These plums were grown in my friends garden opposite my house in Leicestershire in the UK. 

Eve 

    Bottling plums in water

    I have opened a bottle of plums which I bottled in water by packing a Kilner Jar with plums then pouring boiling water over before bringing the bottle back to the boil, keeping it at boiling point for 3 mins then screwing the top on.  I kept tightening the top until the jar was cold and then put it in a cool dark place.  This was 2 years ago and when I opened it yesterday and cooked the plums in a pie they tasted lovely. These plums were grown in my friends garden opposite my house in Leicestershire in the UK. 

    Eve 

     
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  11. Carrots in the sand
Whilst researching new ways of saving energy in the kitchen and innovative kitchen design solutions, I came across your work and was struck by the many ideas and prototypes you have made. My children and I decided to conduct an experiment with carrots by storing them vertically in sand as you suggest. The result has been wonderful, with the carrots re-sprouting roots and leaves (as long as the sand is kept wet). Every time we use a carrot now it is as fresh as if it had just been picked. It has also become a point of conversation with visitors of all ages, providing an opportunity to discuss the real cost of food in terms of energy and waste. I look forward to incorporating more of your storage solutions into the new kitchen I am designing. Thanks,
Jacqueline, Sydney, Australia

    Carrots in the sand

    Whilst researching new ways of saving energy in the kitchen and innovative kitchen design solutions, I came across your work and was struck by the many ideas and prototypes you have made. My children and I decided to conduct an experiment with carrots by storing them vertically in sand as you suggest. The result has been wonderful, with the carrots re-sprouting roots and leaves (as long as the sand is kept wet). Every time we use a carrot now it is as fresh as if it had just been picked. It has also become a point of conversation with visitors of all ages, providing an opportunity to discuss the real cost of food in terms of energy and waste. I look forward to incorporating more of your storage solutions into the new kitchen I am designing. Thanks,

    Jacqueline, Sydney, Australia

     
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  13. Preserving Butter

    I have never really been a big fan of butter, I never really liked the taste of things that were cooked in it and always pictured it as something that will make you fat if you eat it. However recently I have been reading a couple books on nutrition and health and I have come to the conclusion that butter is an easy way of adding necessary fat soluble vitamins in to your everyday diet, and if eaten in moderation butter can be quite healthy for you. I also learned that the darker yellow the butter the more nutritious vitamins it has in it. Also butter from grass fed cows is the most healthy and has many nutrients in it that are hard to find anywhere else stuff for maintaining healthy teeth and bones.

    I decided we should have some butter in our diet but because we are going cruising fridge-less I didn’t know how to keep it. So I turned to some old food preservation books.

    One way of preserving butter for day to day use is with a butter bell. I remember my mother had one of these when I was younger. I didn’t have fond memories of it, I always remember opening it up to the fowl stench rancid butter. I found out in my reading that this was because the water needs to be changed every other day to prevent the growth of bacteria. The butter bell will safely store butter for up to a month as long as you continue to change the water.

    Butter Bell
    A butter bell preserves the butter by soring it upside-down in an small amount of water that creates an airtight seal.

    Butter Bell

    The butter bell solves the issue of preserving butter in day to day use but what about for longterm storage? Again I turned to the pages of an old book this time an old cook book called the Presbyterian Cookbook. In there I found that for long term storage of butter with out a fridge you can place sticks of butter in a large jar thats filled with a salt brine. The brine needs to be really salty in order to keep anything from growing in the butter, and it works best if its stored in a cool dark place like a cellar or in our case, the bilge. We have yet to try this method but when we do I will fill you in on the details.

    Here is the excerpt from the book:
    How to Keep Butter: excerpt from Presbyterian Cookbook

    - Eric Taylor, San Diego CA

     
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  15. Preserving citrus with sand

    When you buy citrus you should always rinse it in a 10-to-1 water to bleach ratio (10 parts water, 1 part bleach) and let them air dry.

    To store citrus longer you can get a 5 gallon bucket and fill it with clean sand.  Bury the clean citrus in the sand and lightly pack it down.

    The sand fills the pores of the citrus and it takes longer to go bad.

    - Lynn from LA, USA

     
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  17. Bitter Eggplants

    If you find that eggplant dishes often taste bitter, try this trick.

    If making moussaka or eggplant parmesan, cut the eggplant into slices for use. Sprinkle salt over the eggplant slices on both sides and let sit for about 10 minutes. The salt will make them sweat their bitter liquid out. Wipe this off with a (paper) towel and your eggplant dish will not have that bitter flavour!

    -Florin, Canada

     
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  19. potatoes in a brick house with sand inside

    My father used to harvest our potatoes before the frost, clean off the dirt by hand and sort them at the same time to make sure they were perfect for keeping (no bug holes or rot).  Usually he would put them in a sack and cover them, but at other times he would bury them in a funny little brick house he had built to keep sand clean and dry.  The “roof ” was a slanting weather proof lid, which we had to lift when we sorted through the sand for potatoes.  We thought this was a great game, but sometimes being kids we would play a bit too wildly and then would have to tidy up.

    I always remember what fun it was to help in that way and how good the potatoes tasted when we roasted them under the fire grate.  We were always hungry in those days and there was nothing left to waste!

    - Barbara Robson, UK

     
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