1. Don’t throw water after boiling tomatoes!
Last week, I’ve introduced how to make Italian tomato sauce. Since two Italian family taught me about it, various tips came up. One of interesting knowledge, from Angela’s family from Puglia, was about the water after boiling tomatoes.
When you boil and filter tomatoes (check the step 6-7 from the workshop images), you get the water in the down bowl. Wash your bottles with that water. It will disinfect sterilized bottles again. It works because tomatoes contains antimicrobials as citrus fruits. 
If you still have the water left, give to your plants. It is a good nutrient. 
As Angela said “here, nothing to throw!”

    Don’t throw water after boiling tomatoes!

    Last week, I’ve introduced how to make Italian tomato sauce. Since two Italian family taught me about it, various tips came up. One of interesting knowledge, from Angela’s family from Puglia, was about the water after boiling tomatoes.

    When you boil and filter tomatoes (check the step 6-7 from the workshop images), you get the water in the down bowl. Wash your bottles with that water. It will disinfect sterilized bottles again. It works because tomatoes contains antimicrobials as citrus fruits. 

    If you still have the water left, give to your plants. It is a good nutrient. 

    As Angela said “here, nothing to throw!”

     
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  3. How to make Italian tomato sauce, la salsa
This summer, I was very lucky to have a two day intensive tomato sauce workshop with Italian friends. The process is introduced simply on the image. It requires some time to devote yourself but is much easier than what I thought :-) Try it at home on a sunny day! It is a big fun and pleasure!
*One important thing to note: We followed traditional recipes from two Italian families. These families don’t add any citric acid or salt inside, which actually help tomatoes keep away from spoilage. Also personally, I don’t fancy the acid taste in the tomato sauce, either.
However, before eating your sauce afterwards, remember to cook the sauce above 80 degrees at least for 15 minutes against the danger of botulism.

    How to make Italian tomato sauce, la salsa

    This summer, I was very lucky to have a two day intensive tomato sauce workshop with Italian friends. The process is introduced simply on the image. It requires some time to devote yourself but is much easier than what I thought :-) Try it at home on a sunny day! It is a big fun and pleasure!

    *One important thing to note: We followed traditional recipes from two Italian families. These families don’t add any citric acid or salt inside, which actually help tomatoes keep away from spoilage. Also personally, I don’t fancy the acid taste in the tomato sauce, either.

    However, before eating your sauce afterwards, remember to cook the sauce above 80 degrees at least for 15 minutes against the danger of botulism.

     
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  5. Pie as a way to preserve fruits
"Food preservation in colonial North America" 
My family immigrated to North America during the Colonial Period. My grandmother told me that people cooked pies to preserve the food in them. When cooked, the fruit in fruit pies dehydrates some and it helps preserve the fruit. Adding sugar to the pie will increase the length of time the pie can be stored at room temperature, about 3 days. I tried this and it does work, especially with a cotton towel placed over the pie to keep insects off the food. The towel also allows air circulation around the pie.
- Sigrid, USA

* image from a book “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets”, 1922

    Pie as a way to preserve fruits

    "Food preservation in colonial North America" 

    My family immigrated to North America during the Colonial Period. My grandmother told me that people cooked pies to preserve the food in them. When cooked, the fruit in fruit pies dehydrates some and it helps preserve the fruit. Adding sugar to the pie will increase the length of time the pie can be stored at room temperature, about 3 days. I tried this and it does work, especially with a cotton towel placed over the pie to keep insects off the food. The towel also allows air circulation around the pie.

    - Sigrid, USA

    * image from a book “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets”, 1922

     
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  7. Bitter Eggplants

    If you find that eggplant dishes often taste bitter, try this trick.

    If making moussaka or eggplant parmesan, cut the eggplant into slices for use. Sprinkle salt over the eggplant slices on both sides and let sit for about 10 minutes. The salt will make them sweat their bitter liquid out. Wipe this off with a (paper) towel and your eggplant dish will not have that bitter flavour!

    -Florin, Canada

     
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  9. Cooking chickpeas faster

    Adding salt to chickpeas makes them cook faster. Don’t forget to soak dry chickpeas overnight before cooking. Note that if salt is added to beans they will not cook.

    - Stella Rodrigues, UK

     
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  11. Make your own stock

    Keep all bones and offcuts of meat, chicken or fish. Also keep vegetable ends, peelings etc and look up the recipe for making your own stocks. Not only do you save waste, but you get the benefit of awesome flavours using fresh home made stock. If you don’t have time to do it immediately - keep a container in the freezer and add to it until you’re ready.

    - Anji, North Queensland, Australia

     
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