1. heytoyourmamanem:

Dolores Harris, daughter of FSA (Farm Security Administration) client George Harris, with canned food prepared by her mother. Dameron, Maryland.
August 1940
Jack Delano, photographer
Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

    heytoyourmamanem:

    Dolores Harris, daughter of FSA (Farm Security Administration) client George Harris, with canned food prepared by her mother. Dameron, Maryland.

    August 1940

    Jack Delano, photographer

    Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

     
  2. Share |
  3. Bottling plums in water
I have opened a bottle of plums which I bottled in water by packing a Kilner Jar with plums then pouring boiling water over before bringing the bottle back to the boil, keeping it at boiling point for 3 mins then screwing the top on.  I kept tightening the top until the jar was cold and then put it in a cool dark place.  This was 2 years ago and when I opened it yesterday and cooked the plums in a pie they tasted lovely. These plums were grown in my friends garden opposite my house in Leicestershire in the UK. 

Eve 

    Bottling plums in water

    I have opened a bottle of plums which I bottled in water by packing a Kilner Jar with plums then pouring boiling water over before bringing the bottle back to the boil, keeping it at boiling point for 3 mins then screwing the top on.  I kept tightening the top until the jar was cold and then put it in a cool dark place.  This was 2 years ago and when I opened it yesterday and cooked the plums in a pie they tasted lovely. These plums were grown in my friends garden opposite my house in Leicestershire in the UK. 

    Eve 

     
  4. Share |
  5. Pie as a way to preserve fruits
"Food preservation in colonial North America" 
My family immigrated to North America during the Colonial Period. My grandmother told me that people cooked pies to preserve the food in them. When cooked, the fruit in fruit pies dehydrates some and it helps preserve the fruit. Adding sugar to the pie will increase the length of time the pie can be stored at room temperature, about 3 days. I tried this and it does work, especially with a cotton towel placed over the pie to keep insects off the food. The towel also allows air circulation around the pie.
- Sigrid, USA

* image from a book “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets”, 1922

    Pie as a way to preserve fruits

    "Food preservation in colonial North America" 

    My family immigrated to North America during the Colonial Period. My grandmother told me that people cooked pies to preserve the food in them. When cooked, the fruit in fruit pies dehydrates some and it helps preserve the fruit. Adding sugar to the pie will increase the length of time the pie can be stored at room temperature, about 3 days. I tried this and it does work, especially with a cotton towel placed over the pie to keep insects off the food. The towel also allows air circulation around the pie.

    - Sigrid, USA

    * image from a book “Igleheart’s Cake Secrets”, 1922

     
  6. Share |
  7. Carrots in the sand
Whilst researching new ways of saving energy in the kitchen and innovative kitchen design solutions, I came across your work and was struck by the many ideas and prototypes you have made. My children and I decided to conduct an experiment with carrots by storing them vertically in sand as you suggest. The result has been wonderful, with the carrots re-sprouting roots and leaves (as long as the sand is kept wet). Every time we use a carrot now it is as fresh as if it had just been picked. It has also become a point of conversation with visitors of all ages, providing an opportunity to discuss the real cost of food in terms of energy and waste. I look forward to incorporating more of your storage solutions into the new kitchen I am designing. Thanks,
Jacqueline, Sydney, Australia

    Carrots in the sand

    Whilst researching new ways of saving energy in the kitchen and innovative kitchen design solutions, I came across your work and was struck by the many ideas and prototypes you have made. My children and I decided to conduct an experiment with carrots by storing them vertically in sand as you suggest. The result has been wonderful, with the carrots re-sprouting roots and leaves (as long as the sand is kept wet). Every time we use a carrot now it is as fresh as if it had just been picked. It has also become a point of conversation with visitors of all ages, providing an opportunity to discuss the real cost of food in terms of energy and waste. I look forward to incorporating more of your storage solutions into the new kitchen I am designing. Thanks,

    Jacqueline, Sydney, Australia

     
  8. Share |
  9. Keeping peaches with a gentle care ;-)
Fresh peaches are not easy to keep long. But there are still some ways to help peaches stay better and longer:- Put them in a way that they don’t touch each other.- Keeping them upside down (the stalk down) helps, too. - Avoid the direct sunlight. - In order to avoid fruit flies, clean the fruits well with water before keeping them (you need to dry them well after cleaning). Some do it with very hot water quickly, but we didn’t tried it yet. In general, give a try to observe and understand how your fruits stay. Depending on the surrounding, you will see different reactions. Maybe you will enjoy some days with your fruits or you will need to have all the fruits as a dinner to consume them, or make jams or marmalade. By trying this, you will understand how much and which fruits to buy. This will bring you a little but big and healthy change on your consumption on food! :-)

    Keeping peaches with a gentle care ;-)

    Fresh peaches are not easy to keep long.
    But there are still some ways to help peaches stay better and longer:

    - Put them in a way that they don’t touch each other.
    - Keeping them upside down (the stalk down) helps, too.
    - Avoid the direct sunlight.

    - In order to avoid fruit flies, clean the fruits well with water before keeping them (you need to dry them well after cleaning). Some do it with very hot water quickly, but we didn’t tried it yet.

    In general, give a try to observe and understand how your fruits stay. Depending on the surrounding, you will see different reactions. Maybe you will enjoy some days with your fruits or you will need to have all the fruits as a dinner to consume them, or make jams or marmalade. By trying this, you will understand how much and which fruits to buy. This will bring you a little but big and healthy change on your consumption on food! :-)

     
  10. Share |
  11. water well storage in old times

    " It was the time without a fridge. We used to put the food in a bucket in the well just over the water level. The well was deep enough to keep the chilling air inside from cold water. So we would have two buckets hanging for the well, one for water, one for food….yes…food like butter, that rough but top tasty homemade butter…."

    I was excited to listen this story from my 82 year old Italian grandfather this evening! 

     
  12. Share |
  13. Which brand of canned tuna do you choose for your dish? I got to know that last year Greenpeace announced canned tuna sustainable rankings in some countries:
Canada
korea
Australia Pacific
Italy
If you are in one of those countries, check out the list and apply your knowledge from now on when you buy a can of tuna!
* I cannot find the information of Japan and US which are the largest consumers of canned tuna. If you know, please share with me!

    Which brand of canned tuna do you choose for your dish? I got to know that last year Greenpeace announced canned tuna sustainable rankings in some countries:

    Canada

    korea

    Australia Pacific

    Italy

    If you are in one of those countries, check out the list and apply your knowledge from now on when you buy a can of tuna!

    * I cannot find the information of Japan and US which are the largest consumers of canned tuna. If you know, please share with me!

     
  14. Share |
  15. It illustrates industrial agriculture and sustainable agriculture with clear information. We strongly recommand to watch it! Do we really need industrial agriculture to feed us? You will get a same answer as us after you watch this video!

     
  16. Share |
  17. Storing Potatoes with an Apple

    To determine if we could achieve even better results by storing potatoes with an apple, we stored two 5-pound bags of russet potatoes, one with an apple and the other without, in a dry, dark, cool, well-ventilated spot and checked on both bags every other day for eight weeks. The potatoes in both bags looked fine until the three-week point, when one of the potatoes stored without the apple began to sprout. Two weeks later all but one of the potatoes stored without the apple had sprouted.

    By comparison, the potatoes stored with the apple remained firm and free of sprouts, though a great deal of condensation had built up in the bag. At the eight-week point the potatoes without the apple were largely soft, shriveled, and sad looking. The potatoes stored with the apple, on the other hand, were mostly firm (small soft spots had developed on two of them) and looked good.

    Dr. Greg Porter, associate professor of agronomy, and Dr. Alfred Bushway, professor of food science and human nutrition, both at the University of Maine in Orono, concurred that the ripe apple gives off ethylene gas as it respires. Simply put, the ethylene gas, as well as other organic alcohols emitted by the apple, suppresses the elongation of the potatoes’ cells, which is what causes the sprouts to form.

    - from cook’s illustrated

    Read a full original article here: storing potatoes

     
  18. Share |
  19. How to store tomatoes

    Red tomatoes starts to get damaged under 10 degree. Keep them always outside the fridge. You will feel also big difference on its taste! -save food from fridge! ;-)

     
  20. Share |